HomeDramas - Good movies you can watch on Netflix while stuck at home

Dramas - Good movies you can watch on Netflix while stuck at home

Dramas - Good movies you can watch on Netflix while stuck at home
"2oth Century Women": One of the best movies of the past decade, Mike Mills' coming-of-age drama follows a teenage boy being raised by a collection of women in the late '70s. Watch this movie and cry because it's great – and then cry because somehow Annette Bening wasn't nominated for Best Actress.

"A Serious Man": One of the Coen Brothers' most under-appreciated projects, "A Serious Man" is a fascinating and funny dark comedy about a professor whose seemingly normal existence and faith is rattled when his marriage, job and reputation begin to unravel.

"A Single Man": In a just world, Colin Firth would've won his Best Actor Oscar for this stellar drama (directed by fashion icon Tom Ford) about a gay man in the '60s shook by the recent death of his boyfriend.

"Atlantics": Part drama and part ghost story, this alluring should've-been-Oscar-nominated film from Senegal follows a young woman sent adrift when her lover leaves the country to find better work across the ocean. Meanwhile, back at home, young women keep getting possessed by angry spirits. So that's not good! (But the movie is.)

"Black Sea": Think having to practice social distancing is stressful and claustrophobic? Think about the poor stars of this tense and taut aquatic thriller about a bunch of thieves stuck in a submarine trying to hunt for gold at the bottom of the sea.

"Da 5 Bloods": Spike Lee takes on Vietnam in his pained and passionate follow-up to the Oscar-winning "BlacKkKlansman," following four veterans (headlined by an award-worthy Delroy Lindo) as they return to the country they fought across to recover their fallen comrade – and recover a trunk of gold bars that they vowed to return for back in the day.

"The End of the Tour": Thinking of FINALLY finishing "Infinite Jest" over this quarantine? Don't kid yourself; you won't finish. So watch this drama instead about a writer (Jesse Eisenberg) tasked to profile David Foster Wallace (Jason Segel), sparring and learning from each other over the course of the interviews.

"The Florida Project": A lovely indie project from acclaimed director Sean Baker, "The Florida Project" hangs out at a bright pink motel outside of Disney World with its even brighter characters – from an exploration-happy little girl to her unpolished young mother to the strained man (an Oscar-nominated Willem Dafoe) who tries to contain the chaos at the building.

"Good Time": Did you love "Uncut Gems"? Then you'll love this fellow gritty and delightfully stressful trip into the criminal underworld from the Safdie Brothers, starring Robert Pattinson (make a "Twilight" joke at your own risk!) as a crappy thief trying to get his brother out of prison after a job gone wrong.

"Her": I get it: A movie about a man falling in love with an app sounds REAL strange. But Spike Jonze's romantic drama is bittersweet, lovely, smart and painfully human for a movie about a guy loving an operating system. (Available until July 28)

"I Lost My Body": Animated movies don't come much stranger – but also much better – than this Oscar-nominated hand-drawn bittersweet and bizarre beauty about a sentient severed hand crawling its way back across the city to its rightful owner.

"Inside Man": Spike Lee's most accessible movie is also one of his most purely entertaining with this unconventional heist movie starring a very fashionable Denzel Washington trying to hostage-negotiate a bizarre New York City bank robbery that keeps twisting and turning.

"The Irishman": Listen, you've finally got a lot of time on your hands. So now there's no excuse for not checking out Martin Scorsese's excellent gangster epic. It's a gripping gut punch of a movie, immaculately performed, but it's also not without its entertainment value. (Give me EVERY Al Pacino line-reading, please.) It's a powerful (seemingly) final statement from Scorsese.

"Jarhead": A star-studded cast (Jake Gyllenhaal, Jamie Foxx, Chris Cooper and Peter Sarsgaard) and an acclaimed behind-the-scenes crew – from "American Beauty" and "1917" director Sam Mendes to cinematographer supreme Roger Deakins ("Blade Runner 2049") – bring a tense, darkly comic war story about young recruits battling the stressful boredom of the Gulf War. (Available until July 31)

"Jerry Maguire": SHOW ME THE FAMOUS '90s ROMANTIC DRAMA ABOUT A COCKY SPORTS AGENT CHANGING HIS LIFE AROUND! Wow, timely reference; excellent work, me. But anyways, watch "Jerry Maguire." It's still good!

"Kon-Tiki": Is there a better movie to watch when you can't leave your house than an adventure movie about men out on the incredible open sea? I argue no. This thrilling 2012 adventure about two explorers setting sail on a raft and the obvious dangers they meet along the way might be just what the doctor ordered, getting you out on the gorgeous ocean without leaving the couch.

"Lady Bird": Greta Gerwig's breakthrough directorial effort is one of the most effortlessly charming and wise coming-of-age stories you'll see, following a young snobbish high schooler (Saoirse Ronan) as she both bonds and battles with her weary hard-working mother (Laurie Metcalf). There's bound to be at least one moment you'll feel like was ripped out of your own high school or family's experience.

"Legend": What's better than one Tom Hardy? TWO Tom Hardys! That's the selling point of this gangster drama, a true-life caper about twin British mobsters Ronnie and Reggie Kray in the '60s.

"Marriage Story": One of the best movies of last year is at your fingertips thanks to Netflix with this biting drama about a husband and wife (Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson, never better) trying to survive a cross-country divorce.

"The Master": Another Paul Thomas Anderson masterwork, Joaquin Phoenix stars as a military vet lost at home after the war but finds a new purpose with an intense new religious sect (led by Philip Seymour Hoffman's Lancaster Dodd) that definitely isn't scientology.

"Moonlight": The 2016 Oscar winner is a beautiful, bittersweet and all-too-deserving Best Picture choice, following the life of a young Miami black man through three essential periods in his life.

"Mud": An under-appreciated chapter of the Matthew McConaissance, the Texan shines in this gripping and grounded coming-of-age Mississippi River-soaked tale about two kids who get dragged into the troubles of a lonely drifter hiding out in the swampy woods. It's impeccably acted with some excellent slow-burn tension and an addictive lazy raft ride down the river atmosphere.

"Pan's Labyrinth": Before he won Best Picture for "The Shape of Water," writer-director Guillermo del Toro's gorgeously gothic imagination earned him three Oscars with this fairy tale about a young girl who escapes the scary war-scarred world around her via a magical fantasy that may end up being just as dangerous.

"The Perks of Being a Wallflower": Growing up is hard; just ask the high school outsiders in this Stephen Chbosky's winning adaptation of his own bestselling coming-of-age novel of the same name.

"Roma": Alfonso Cuaron's Oscar-winning character study is a gorgeous black-and-white slow burn, following a maid as her life changes along with the rich family she works for. It's mesmerizing work.

"The Social Network": A movie about Facebook sounds terrible. (Movies about computers, in general, are terrible.) But the combined forces of David Fincher's shadowy and ominous direction, Aaron Sorkin's whip-snap script, and pitch-perfect performances from the likes of Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Armie Hammer, Rooney Mara and even Justin Timberlake turned a bad idea into the best movie of the last decade.

"Spotlight": Watching a crew of journalists in bland khakis do their jobs and do the often-tedious shoe-leather necessary to break a story shouldn't be exciting and engaging – but this Best Picture-winning procedural drama, about the uncovering of the Catholic Church's cover-up of sexual assault cases by some of its priests, makes it a slow-boiling thrill. A low-key excellent film.

"The Squid and the Whale": If you enjoyed "Marriage Story" – OK, maybe "enjoyed" is a strange word to use – be sure to check out writer-director Noah Baumbach's breakout indie hit "The Squid and the Whale," which tells the story of a bitter divorce instead from the viewpoint of a teenager caught in the crossfire.

"Steve Jobs": Screenwriter extraordinaire Aaron Sorkin ("The Social Network") sets his pen on another tech superstar in this wildly watchable drama, showcasing three massive moments in the Apple savior's life. Sharply written, sharply directed and sharply performed, it deserved better than to be a flop in theaters – so check it out now.

"Taxi Driver": Another Martin Scorsese classic, this drama follows the infamous Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro, an iconic role) as he patrols a scuzzy '70s New York City in his cab and decides he will play savior for a young prostitute – played by Jodie Foster in a breakthrough performance – by any means necessary. It's like "Joker" – but good.

"There Will Be Blood": Paul Thomas Anderson's American masterpiece follows Oscar winner Daniel Day Lewis as the iconic Daniel Plainview, a viciously opportunistic oil man waging a war against a local pastor trying to found a new church on the land. Grand and gorgeous.

"Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy": Quick: Name a British actor. Yep, they're probably in this tense, taut, impeccably crafted and impenetrably twisty spy thriller about a spy (Gary Oldman) trying to find a Soviet mole inside British intelligence.

"We Are Your Friends": This Zac Efron drama about a DJ trying to make it big in the electronic music world is ... about as dumb as it sounds. But it's got a sweet, electric, well-intended bro energy to it that just might just be the perfect brainless binge during heavy times.

"Zodiac": If you love true crime stories, you'll love David Fincher's incredible serial killer drama "Zodiac" about the various police officers and newspapermen trying to track down one of the nation's most notorious murderers. It's one of the young century's best movies – even though it will absolutely ruin the song "Hurdy Gurdy Man" for you forever.

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